Renzulli Fine Art
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William Renzulli Gallery

Early in my “art career” my work was limited to urban architecture (Wilmington and Philadelphia). It was only after my technical skills improved and my work became more painterly that my interests expanded to include rural (barns and farms) and industrial landscapes. If you could look into my studio today you would see a large rural landscape in progress on my easel, and an urban streetscape on the drawing table.

Not only the subject matter changed. My earliest paintings were done with pen, ink, and markers. Today I work with watercolors, oil and acrylic, soft pastels, and combinations thereof.

Architecture

ARCHITECTURE & URBAN LANDSCAPES

Barns

FOR THE LOVE OF BARNS

Books

BOOKS

Clay

WORKING WITH CLAY

Industrial

INDUSTRIAL LANDSCAPES

Landscape

LANDSCAPES

Italia

ITALIA

Architecture

DRAWINGS

Why did I paint what I painted?

I don’t know if I have a clear and precise answer to this question. When I was drawing as a hobby the subjects were usually people or animals, copied from a magazine photo, rendered in pencil and occasionally ink. As I recall, it was on family vacations in Cape May that I first began drawing buildings in my sketchbook with a fountain pen. I was attracted to the architecture of the Victorian homes and grand hotels. I became fascinated with simple expressive line drawings, which were often used in commercial illustrations before being replaced by computerized graphics I collected delightful tiny line drawings from the New Yorker magazine that printed throughout their pages. But the single greatest influence came from the British illustrator/travel artist, Paul Hogarth. His drawings and watercolors continue to inspire me some 45 years later. I shamelessly adopted his style and approach to rendering architecture. Fortunately, I allowed enough of myself to come through to establish my own recognizable “style”. This can easily be seen in my early paintings of Wilmington streetscapes and buildings. As an illustrator, Hogarth was a storyteller, and I soon began to think of myself in the same way. I recognized that my paintings were very graphic and did not fit into the category of fine art, and I was very comfortable with that.
William Renzulli Gallery
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